Presentation on the threat of invasive plant species in our environment.

June 04, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

On May 3rd, the Chesterfield Conservation Commission hosted a presentation by Doug Cygan, the New Hampshire Invasive Species Coordinator at the N.H. Department of Agriculture, educating the general public on the growing threat of invasive plant species in our environment. Many of us are already aware of these new interlopers, but some of us are still unaware of the threat they pose. Perhaps one of the most evident, is the highly visible japanese knotweed spreading along our roadsides. And if you have driven down 91 recently, you will witness many trees being lost to the tangled mat of oriental bittersweet and multiflora rose enveloping them. Our forests and woodlands are being challenged by glossy buckthorn, Japanese barberry and mile-a-minute vine, to mention a few. Many sites will simply be lost to these aggressive newcomers, resulting in new ecosystems. But there is much we can do to stem their impact in our yards and natural spaces.  Doug’s presentation was designed to give those in attendance the information needed in identifying and removing these opportunistic plants from the local landscape. A wealth of information was shared in a very informative, entertaining program. He also handed out his newest edition of the New Hampshire Guide to Upland Invasive Species booklet, a great source for tackling the problem. Extra copies were provided, which can be found in the Chesterfield Library. Along with Doug’s booklet, I included some wonderful resources gathered from the Cheshire County Conservation District listing native plants that encourage pollinators and other native wildlife into our communities. I like to think of it as a patchwork quilt, that as we plan and pull and plant in each of our yards we begin to build a larger, healthier ecosystem in the region.

 

 hosted a presentation by Doug Cygan, the New Hampshire Invasive Species Coordinator at the N.H. Department of Agriculture, educating the general public on the growing threat of invasive plant species in our environment. Many of us are already aware of these new interlopers, but some of us are still unaware of the threat they pose. Perhaps one of the most evident, is the highly visible japanese knotweed spreading along our roadsides. And if you have driven down 91 recently, you will witness many trees being lost to the tangled mat of oriental bittersweet and multiflora rose enveloping them. Our forests and woodlands are being challenged by glossy buckthorn, Japanese barberry and mile-a-minute vine, to mention a few. Many sites will simply be lost to these aggressive newcomers, resulting in new ecosystems. But there is much we can do to stem their impact in our yards and natural spaces.  Doug’s presentation was designed to give those in attendance the information needed in identifying and removing these opportunistic plants from the local landscape. A wealth of information was shared in a very informative, entertaining program. He also handed out his newest edition of the New Hampshire Guide to Upland Invasive Species booklet, a great source for tackling the problem. Extra copies were provided, which can be found in the Chesterfield Library. Along with Doug’s booklet, I included some wonderful resources gathered from the Cheshire County Conservation District listing native plants that encourage pollinators and other native wildlife into our communities. I like to think of it as a patchwork quilt, that as we plan and pull and plant in each of our yards we begin to build a larger, healthier ecosystem in the region.

From Kathy Thatcher

Chesterfield Conservation Commission

 


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